Have you even thought about what it takes to obtain a PhD in any type of musical performance? As a musician you know that talent can come naturally. Those with musical talent seem to be born with it. Musical skill is something that artists can perfect though. Studying music professionally can be a very rewarding experience and can boost your career immensely for both musical performers as well as educators.

 

The Highest Level of Musical Study

 For studying music professionally in the States, there are two main options for the top degrees. The Doctor of Musical Arts (DMA) and the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) are the two terminal degrees in music education. Some schools will offer both programs, and there are some similarities and similar requirements for both.

 

The Doctor of Musical Arts (DMA)

This degree can be completed in three to five years. It allows gifted music students to get ready for promising careers in music while studying the subtleties of music theory and history. DMA students will train with artists, complete research projects and perform at major recitals during the program. A requirement at some schools is to learn a foreign language. There are several specializations for this degree, including musical performance, composition or conducting music.

 

A PhD in Music

A PhD program in music will focus more on academic research rather than musical performance. This degree option can take between four to six years to complete. Specializations include musicology, music theory or music history. There is a specific requirement  in terms of coursework and qualifying exams for this type of program. Also, students must write and defend a thesis on an individual research topic. This type of program will also require students to learn at least one foreign language. Making the choice between the two types of top music degrees will depend on how you envision your musical career to unfold.

 

Music apps are useful for musicians who are traveling, touring and recording. They can be used on portable devices such as laptops, iPhones or iPads. They can also be integrated into studio equipment through your computer system. They can be helpful in editing, tuning and creating backbeats.

 

Cleartune     

For tuning stringed instruments and wind instruments, Cleartune is a chromatic digital tuner that has a good range to get the job done. It is easy to find a desired pitch because of the way that the note wheel is designed. You can tune your instrument with a precision of up to 1/100th semitone. The cost for the app is $4 and it is also available for Android devices.

 

Beatmaker 2

This updated version of Beatmaker has an easy to use interface and a large selection of back beats to choose from. This is a music production app with many different features. You could create a tempo of your own by including custom drum beats or keyboard notes. Once the beat has been created you can edit the volume, pitch and groove to customize your sound for your song writing and recording needs. This app costs $20 and is only available for iOS.

 

Real Time Analyzers

This music app has the capability of listening to music and displaying its frequency ranges in audio samples. When you are in the process of fine tuning your tracks, this app will certainly help you out. It will also help with recording live performances. The cost of this music app is $11. 

 

FourTrack

FourTrack is an app which you will find very useful during the editing stage of your music production. You can record and layer audio sounds to make songs and perfect them for 16-bit or 44.1kHz quality. This app has an export feature so you can record with software on your desktop computer. It costs $5 and you can also get it for Android. 

Online music streaming and can be a quick and efficient method for getting your music out there for listeners to enjoy.  Many speculate that streaming is the future of music consumption.  Statistics already show a rising number of streaming site subscribers while digital downloads, album and single alike, are declining fast.  There are a growing number of great streaming sites out there to choose from on the web.  Lets take a look at a few!

 

Groovesharkimages-3

Grooveshark is an overall great music streaming site.  You can search for almost any song and create a playlist, just as on an iPod, with the same playback options.  Its only fault is that sometimes the site will freeze and your playlist is lost.

 

 

 

spotify music streamingSpotify

Spotify is one of the best known music streaming sites out there. It has a catalog of over 20 million songs available for listening. Besides creating a playlist or listening to one album, you can also use Spotify’s radio option. This feature will choose music related to the original artists you were listening to and create a unique playlist for you. You can subscribe to their premium plan to get an ad-free version as well as higher quality tracks.

 

 

PandoraPandora Music Streaming

This music streaming site takes the personal playlist to a whole new level. You can choose a song and then Pandora will create a custom radio station of similar music. It works really well the recommendations for music selections are usually good choices based on the song you picked. With their premium service you can get rid of the ads and download a desktop app.

 

 

Google Play Music StreamingGoogle Play

Google Play is another great option for music streaming. You can choose from over 20 million songs to listen to. This streaming service is great when it comes to mobile listening options so you are not restricted to listening to music from your desktop.

 

 

MixcloudMixCloud Music Streaming

 

Mixcloud has a bit of different collection of music than the other music streaming services mentioned. They have a large collection of DJ mixes, podcasts and longer audio format recordings. It is great for listening to background music for long periods of time. 

 

 

 

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Thanks for stepping into The Record Shop Nashville Recording Studio!  Follow & Chat with us on Twitter @therecordshop for daily updates from Gio & His Henchmen!  We hope to see y’all again!

 

Summer is the best time to take in outdoor music performances and Nashville hosts some of the best summer music festivals around. Be sure to check out your favorite bands throughout the summer!

 

June

In mid-June there is the American Artisan Festival which is held at the Centennial Park. This festival mainly focuses on various handmade crafts, but also features local music performances. The TNN Country Awards are also in mid-June. This is a country music lover’s haven and the awards show features country stars from across the States. The Celtic Music and Summer Solstice Celebration is also happening in June. Here you will find the best of all things Scottish and Irish including Celtic dancing, music and of course, the bagpipes. The International Country Music Fan Fair happens in June too. This festival hosts over 24,000 country music fans and over 100 different country artists. It takes place at the Opryland and the fairgrounds.

 

July

The main event that takes place in July is the July 4th Independence Day celebration. These take place at Riverfront Park and there will be lots of food as well as an awesome fireworks show. This event is fun for the whole family.

     

August

In August be sure to check out the Music City Pig Fest. It takes place in mid-August at the National Guard Armory. It includes a huge array of barbeque vendors as well as entertaining activities for kids such as pony rides.

 

September

The Tennessee State Fair takes place in mid-September and it is one of the largest events in Nashville. There will be amusement rides, livestock shows, games, a petting zoo as well as acrobatics and karaoke. The Nashville Shakespeare Festival will be in early September. At this festival you can enjoy live theatre outside at Centennial Park. At the end of September is the African Street Festival which features a celebration of African culture through music, food and poetry.

 

     

 

Having reliable apps available to you on your portable devices can help to make the music recording process more mobile and flexible.  Music apps out there can assist you with tuning, editing and songwriting.  Here are a few of the best apps for Android.

 

ChordBot ProChordBot App

ChordBot is an app that will help with the songwriting process on the guitar immensely.  The chord sequencer is very user friendly. You can complete entire songs within the app and then export the songs as MIDI or WV file formats.  This app costs $5.

 

PocketBand ProPocket Band App

PocketBand is a great app that is useful for both DJs and recording artists. It contains polyphonic synthesizers for 125 instruments, 35 drum beats as well as a synthetic modulator.  You can also add recordings done on a microphone and edit them until they are a completed track using the app.  An advantage of PocketBand is that there is a large online community who uses this app and participate in publishing songs, voting on others’ tracks and collaboration online.  It can be bought for $10.

                                                    (Pictured Below: Screen Shot from SoundStack Android App)

Sound LooperSound Stack Looper App

Sound Looper,and many other loop apps, can be used as part of the songwriting and music editing with great success. Sound Looper can be used to edit a variety of music from hip hop to dub-step or rock. Sound Looper has the capability of taking a recording that you have input, adjusting its volume and pitch and then producing an infinite loop that you are able to use for recordings. The user interface is very easy to use, which helps make Sound Looper one of the best apps of its type for Android users. It is a great value as well, at a price of $1.

 

Archetype Guitar TunerArchetype Tuner App

The Archetype Guitar Tuner app is very handy when you are traveling for gigs and are away from your studio.  It does well in recognizing pitch and costs $5.           

 

 

 

 

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Thanks for spending some with us today in The Record Shop Nashville Recording Studio.  We hope we’ve been informative.  Please take a look around our website, and be sure to follow & chat with us on Twitter @therecordshop for daily updates from Gio & His Henchmen!!

 

A charity event or concert can be a great way to land that first live gig as a new artist or band. Charities are usually happy to have artists give their time for live performances at their events as it enhances the overall value and excitement of an event.  As a musician there are many benefits in performing at charity events.  These can include expanding your fan base, providing you exposure to new industry professionals, getting performance experience, and having a fun and rewarding way to give back to the community.

 

Supporting Great Causes as a Musician

Hosting a charity concert or donating album sales to charity by using a program like Reverbnation’s Music for Good will often get you the attention and support of local press and media. Charities such as United Way, Habitat for Humanity and the American Cancer Society will often host events which draw large crowds.  A simple Google search can lead you to a whole directory of charities in your local area.  From there you are only a phone call or email away from getting booked at a charity event.  If you don’t get the gig don’t fret.  The organization now knows who you are and that you want to help them, which may lead to you being one of the first artists they call when they put on their next event!

 

Music for GoodMusic For Good Charity Event

Reverbnation is a great site to be a part of as a new artist because it allows your music to be easily accessible by fans and it allows you to be part of the massive online Reverbnation music community. Music for Good is a charity donation program offered by Reverbnation.  It allows artists to give a portion of money made from each song to a charity of the artist’s choice.  Artists have the opportunity to select the portion of money that is donated from each song purchased, as well as the specific songs they want to be part of the program.

 

FanDistro Project       FanDistro Charity Event

FanDistro is way to help charities and reward your fans at the same time.  By creating a project page and sending it to your fans they can then share your music or purchase your songs.  If they do then they are rewarded with free merchandise and 20% of the sales go a charity in the fan’s name. 

Teaching music lessons is one way to translate your musical talent into abundant income. It also provides great incentive for honing your craft and reaching your goals in terms of perfecting your skills. Teaching music lessons can be rewarding, fun and a worthwhile experience. Not only are you helping someone learn a new skill, but you get to spend time playing an instrument you love and will enjoy more time for playing music. 

 

The First Steps to Take

Your local music store can be a great resource for you as a new music teacher. You can expand your roster of students by meeting new students and getting your name out there. Deciding on a teaching schedule is one of the first steps to take. You have to decide if you are willing to teach fulltime and be available to schedule lessons and accommodate students anytime or if you will have a limited timeframe for lessons.

 

Building or Improving a Home Studio

Having the best gear in your studio can go a long way in attracting students to start music lessons and then getting them to become long term students of yours. It will also give you the opportunity to showcase your talents in the best way and give them a sense of the professionalism you have in your teaching practice. You will need a computer with high speed internet access as well as a high quality sound system. You will also require instrument specific equipment depending on the instruments you decide to teach.

 

Money and Payment for Music Lessons

It is a good idea to set up a payment method where you are paid in advance for your lessons and students can purchase lessons in packages of 5, 10 or 15 lessons at a time. You can also set up a tiered system where students are given discounts when they purchase larger packages of lessons at a time.

 

API 512c, Destressers, Purple Audio MC77Hey there friends!  The folks here at The Record Shop’s Nashville Recording Studio have been slaving away making some music that should be hitting your ear drums ASAP.  For now though, we are very happy to continue our never-ending series BEHIND THE GEAR!!  So far we’ve talked about a lot of great gear, but today we’re going to talk about a piece of equipment that is universally acclaimed for its sound and versatility.  The one, the only API 512c Pre Amp! 

Did we say universally acclaimed?  You’re darn tootin’ we did.  In a subjective world of personal tastes and preferences it is hard to come by pieces of gear that practically every person likes, but the API 512c is definitely one of those that breaks the mold.  Engineers have been using these puppies since their creation in the 1970’s by Saul Walker.  The 512c was so perfect that, to this day, it’s design has remained the true to Walker’s classic lunchbox design.API 512c Creator Saul Walker  512c’s have been used on countless recordings by artists such as Prince, The White Stripes, Fleetwood Mac, Jack Johnson, Van Halen, and The Rolling Stones.  This mic/line/instrument pre amp sounds great on literally everything. Drums, vocals, guitars…EVERYTHING. 

Now comes the real fun; the API 512c’s wonderful features!

  • Mic preamp with 65dB gain
  • Front- and rear-panel mic input access
  • Line/instrument preamp with 45dB gain
  • Front-panel line/instrument input
  • LED VU meter for monitoring output level
  • 20dB pad switch, applies to mic/line/instrument
  • 48V switchable phantom power
  • Proprietary API fully discrete circuit design
  • Uses the famous API 2520 Op-Amp

 Us Record Shop Nashville natives absolutely love how much punch and clarity you can achieve with the 512c, which is why we installed six of them into our system.  The transparency of the 512c is something that needs to be talked about more.  These pre-amps bring out every harmonic overtone without adding any coloration to what’s being sent through it.  We highly recommend the 512c to anyone and everyone!

Thanks for tuning in for today’s Behind The Gear.  Feel free to check out The Record Shop Nashville’s full gear list here, and come say Hi to us on Twitter @therecordshop!

Good morning, noon, or night music fans!  Thanks for coming back to The Record Shop’s Nashville Recording Studio for yet another installment of out never-ending, musically-sensational, out-of-this-world series BEHIND THE GEAR!!!  Today’s episode is for all you amazing guitar slingers out there strummin’ and pickin’ them strings ery’day. images-2  We have many great guitar amps inside The Record Shop Nashville’s hallowed halls, but amongst our larger 2×12 and 4×12 amplifiers sits the tinier Fender Champ 600 reissue.  Don’t let its size fool you; this little guy has been putting out sounds that have bewildered and inspired guitar players since the 1940’s!

A Champ’s Journey

The Fender Champ 600 was first manufactured in 1949.  It was the second Champ design; it’s predecessor being the original Fender Champ 800 amplifier that was manufactured one year earlier in 1948.  Like the 800 model, the Champ 600 is a 4-watt amplifier with 3 tubes and an angled rear panel with two inputs and one volume control knob.  It also had the famous diminutive “TV-front” look with the tweed covering, though the 600’s vinyl covering is a two-tone brown instead of the greenish tweed of the 800 .  The only significant difference in the Champ 600’s design is that it has a 6″ speaker cone instead of an 8″ cone.  As time went on the Champ was continuously redesigned with different color vinyl and tweed covering, alternate speaker cone sizes, input & volume control placement, and even being renamed to just The Champ or Champ Amp.  In 1982, the Fender Champ series was discontinued until 2006, when an updated version was released as part of Fender’s Vintage Model Line.  To see a more in-depth history and evolution of the Fender Champ from the company itself click here!

The Record Shop Nashville is glad to have added one of the reissued Fender Champ 600 amps to our gear roster.  Though it is cosmetically similar to the original 600 there are some differences in the specs listed below.Fender Champ 600

  • Available as a 6″ Combo, features an internal 4 ohm speaker output jack
  • 5 Watts RMS
  • Volume Control
  • Power Switch
  • 2 Input (high, low), 1 Channel
  • 1x 12AX7 and 1x 6V6
  • Solid State Diode Rectified
  • Class A, Single Ended

Internally, the Champ reissue has modified Blackface Champ circuitry.  The tone stack settings are hard-wired rather than adjustable via the Treble and Bass controls.  Additional resistors were also placed in the circuit to reduce input gain.  Lastly, Fender switched to solid-state rectification as opposed to the original 5Y3 tube.

We love using this amp for recordings.  Since it’s a smaller speaker, the Champ naturally sounds a little bright, but that is easily cured with proper mic placement.  Regardless, this amp can turn out classic, clean Fender tones just as well as other models.  Crank this puppy up, and you can get a unique blues overdrive tone too; however, this overdrive isn’t as crunchy as most players would probably prefer.  Either way, the Fender Champ 600 is a bonafide tone champion in The Record Shop’s Nashville Recording Studio.  Come on in and see what this little giant can do!

That’s a wrap on today’s installment of Behind the Gear.  We can’t express how much it means to us that you decided to spend some time with us today.  If you’d like to see The Record Shop Nashville’s complete gear list here.  You can follow and chat with us any time on Twitter @therecordshop for updates on our studio projects and blogs!  See you next time.

 

Hey y’all!  Welcome to another jazz-tastic edition of The Record Shop Nashville Recording Studio’s multi-faceted, never-ending series BEHIND THE GEAR!!!  Boy, Oh Boy do we have a fun one for y’all today.  The Fender Jazz Bass has been heralded as one of the greatest bass guitars ever created (read RHCP’s Flea thinks about Jazz bass’s greatness here).  That statement is hard to deny when you think about the long lists of musicians who use them like Geddy Lee, Steve Bailey, and Noel Redding.  The Jazz was also monumentally important to the development and sound of funk, reggae, blues, and fusion music.  So put on your black turtlenecks and berets, and lets dive in to the wonders of this spectacular instrument. 

(Below: Sam ___  inside The Record Shop w/ his Fender Jazz)

NASHVILLE RECORDING STUDIO jazz bassAnd All That Jazz

 Every musician and music lover must pay their respects to Leo Fender for revolutionizing the bass guitar forever by making it smaller and amplified.  The Precision Bass, created in 1951, allowed the bass guitar to actually be heard amongst the Big Bands of the day.  Nine years later Fender changed the game again when they produced the first Fender Jazz Bass.  The Jazz became the new standard to which all electric bass guitars were to be compared to.  It’s tapered neck, off-set waist, and two-set pickups made the Jazz more sonically unique and allowed for faster, easier playing!  The Jazz’s sound, in comparison to it’s predecessor, is much brighter and full in the mids and treble with less emphasis on the fundamental frequency.  The the strength of the mids and treble came from the double, single-coil pickup’s having two pole pieces per string, which Fender used to compete with the famously bright tone of Rickenbacker basses.  It also made the bass perfect for slapping!  From 1961-1963, the newer Jazz models became equipped with new features like going from two control knobs to three (two for pickup volume, one for tone control) and “Spring Felt Mutes“, but the Jazz received some major cosmetic alterations after Fender was bought by CBS.  For a more in depth look at the history of the Fender Jazz Bass click HERE!

Fender Aerodyne Jazz BassEMG Jazz Bass Pickups

 

 

The Record Shop’s Aerodyne Jazz Bass!

 

The Aerodyne series was first introduced in 2004, and they are still being manufactured today!  Here, at The Record Shop’s Nashville Recording Studio, we have a 2007 model in our possession.  Like other Aerodyne Jazz models it has the typical Jazz shape but with some differences.  For one, it is much lighter than your normal Jazz bass weighing about 7lbs whereas the standard is about 10lbs.  Secondly, it is thinner than the standard Jazz because of its 39″ top radius.  Other notable design features are its 1.5″ nut, slim “C”-shaped neck, 20 medium-jumbo frets, fret markers on the side only, cream binding, and its Telecaster input jack.  A stock Aerodyne bass has the split single-coil P-Bass pickup in the middle position and a J-Bass single-coil pickup in the bridge position with volume controls per pickup and one master tone tone knob.  Our Aerodyne has been modified with EMG bass pickups (pictured above).  We also switched out the Master Tone with a concentric pot (the bottom of the pot controls the bass frequencies and the top pot controls the treble) allowing you to have more tone control! 

That wraps up another edition of Behind The Gear!  We thank you so much for spending part of your day with us here at The Record Shop Nashville.  Feel free to explore the rest of our blog, and click HERE for a complete list of our Nashville Recording Studio’s gear!  Also, don’t be such a stranger!  Follow and chat with Gio and his merry henchmen on Twitter @therecordshop!