Luke James from JustLetMeSing.com

Charlotte, NC (PRWEB) April 11, 2011

Luke James from Bowling Green, OH has been named the winner of JustLetMeSing.com’s worldwide singing contest. To win, Luke beat out over 600 other contestants and made it through nine rounds of elimination singing a variety of cover songs and originals. The contestant search began in July 2010 and garnered entries from 48 U.S. states and 45 countries. Contestants uploaded videos and the public was invited to vote for their favorites at JustLetMeSing.com.

Luke received 154,000 votes to edge out the bluesy runner up, Anna McReynolds from Nashville, TN. The competition also had a parody category which was won by Tim Baggett of Newport News, VA. His finale video was a comical take on Billy Joel’s “We Didn’t Start the Fire” called “We Didn’t Read the Label”.

While he was never into music while growing up, Luke finally picked up a guitar at age 18 and hasn’t stopped since. In 2009 and 2010 he made it to the Hollywood round of American Idol. After just missing the top 24 both times Luke decided to pursue a career in music and has been performing shows across the country.

Luke created his own videos, each with its own artistic flair. One of his more popular videos featured him singing Gnarls Barkley’s “Crazy” with over 30 wardrobe changes during the four minute song. Another is his original “We Fall” which showcases him playing guitar with broken strings in a suit and tennis shoes under a tree in the middle of winter.

As the winner, Luke receives the opportunity to record his own single at The Record Shop in Nashville, TN. He will also be performing on Balcony TV Nashville which is shot at The Hard Rock Café. Luke also receives a Virtual Radio Tour valued at $5,000, which exposes his music to radio stations across the country.

Season two of Just Let Me Sing will feature microsites hosted by local media partners in the U.S. and Canada. The site is integrated into Facebook and Twitter to increase the viral spread of the best videos. Anyone interested in becoming a microsite partner or contacting the artists please see below.

Contact Information:
Company: Just Let Me Sing, LLC
Web: https://www.JustLetMeSing.com

Sponsors:
CMC Promotions: https://www.CMCPromotions.com
The Record Shop: https://therecordshopnashville.com
Balcony TV: https://www.BalconyTV.com

Sue Basko, Lawyer for Music and Film, was kind enough to feature The Record Shop as part of her blog…

Sean Giovanni, Nashville Music Producer/ Balcony TV Nashville

by Sue Basko

The Record Shop is one of Nashville’s new creative, up-and-coming recording studios. Sean Giovanni is The Record Shop‘s owner/ music producer/ recording engineer.

Giovanni also runs Balcony TV NashvilleBalcony TV is an internet music show that brings in well-known musical acts to do one acoustic song apiece out on a balcony overlooking a scenic part of a city. Balcony TV was founded in 2006 in London and has since been franchised worldwide to Dublin, Hamburg, Poznan, Brighton, Auckland, Paris, Brisbane, Edmonton, Rennes, Prague, Toronto, and Mexico City. Nashville was the first U.S. city to have Balcony TV, and has been followed by New York and Austin. I love Balcony TV!

Sean Giovanni offers these insightful answers to my probing questions: Read The Full Interview Here……

Eric Normand, author of “The Nashville Musician’s Survival Guide” and accomplished guitarist, teamed up with “For The Record”, to provide some insight on the downside of rocking a little too loud. Eric’s upcoming book, “The Nashville Musician’s Survival Guide” provides a comprehensive reference of what it takes to persevere in the competitive Nashville music community.

You can learn more about Eric and his upcoming release at nashvillemusicianssurvivalmanual.com

Are you ever in complete silence? During the quietest moments of your life, lying in bed about to fall asleep or sitting alone in a quiet room, can you hear the sound of nothing? I wish I could say I can but I can’t. My ears ring constantly, every second of every day, and it’s been that way for over 10 years now. I have permanent nerve damage in my ears from the result of playing music too loudly for extended periods of time without ear protection. I have tinnitus.

“Tinnitus” is derived from the Latin word tinnire, which means to ring. As stated in Wikipedia, it can be caused by a variety of situations; ranging from exposure to excessive sound pressure levels for extended periods of time, ear infections, foreign objects in the ear, nose allergies that prevent or reduce fluid drain, or wax buildup. But sounds at excessive volume seem to be the most common cause. It is an extremely common condition, affecting as many as 50 million Americans (of which about 12 million have it severe enough to seek medical attention). And sadly, it is a condition for which there is no cure.

 

“You´re head is humming and it won´t go in case you don´t know…” – Robert Plant – Stairway to Heaven

That’s right, once you have it you will always have it, and it can progress if preventative measures (they’re called earplugs) aren’t taken.

“I have severe hearing damage. It’s manifested itself as tinnitus, ringing in the ears at frequencies that I play guitar. It hurts, it’s painful, and it’s frustrating.” says Pete Townshend. The excessive volume of The Who’s live performances combined with the deafening volume in which he (and John Entwhistle) listened to playbacks through studio headphones has resulted in tinnitus so severe that some reports have said he can’t even hear his phone ring. His affliction with tinnitus has caused him to abandon electric music performance more than once in recent years, rendering it only practical to play acoustic music live, as has also been the case with artists like Neil Young and Bob Dylan.

It’s not just caused by loud music either. It can be caused by any regular prolonged exposure to excessive volume. For instance, many members of our armed forces are exposed to everything from explosions to jet engines and gunfire to loud machinery, one recent article in the New Yorker estimating it affects nearly half the soldiers exposed to blasts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

 

How much volume can your ears handle?

How many times have you walked into a venue in which a band was playing and thought it was too loud? The human ear was simply not meant to withstand the sound pressure levels produced by megawatt PA systems, electric guitar amps, and even the acoustic, unamplified drum kit in close proximity (especially when played with some conviction). The following chart from the OSHA website shows what is considered permissible noise exposures:

Duration per day, in hours Sound level in dB* – Decibel level
8 90
6 92
4 95
3 97
2 100
1.5 102
1 105
0.5 110
0.25 or less 115

 

Your ears can be exposed to sound pressure levels of 90 dB for eight hours, after which point hearing damage can occur. This ratio is a sliding scale, so when the decibels are increased to 110 decibels (the volume of an average rock band), hearing damage can begin to occur in 30 minutes. The louder the SPLs become (sound pressure levels) the less duration your ears can handle.

Decibel Levels of Environmental Sounds (also from the OSHA website)

Source–Dangerous Level dBA SPL
Produces Pain 120-140
Jet Aircraft During Takeoff (at 20 meters) 130
Snowmobile
Tractor Without Cab
120
Rock Concert 110
Die Forging Hammer
Gas Weed-Whacker
Chain Saw
Pneumatic Drill
100-105
Home Lawn Mowers 95 to 100 dB
Semi-trailers (at 20 meters) 90

 

Source– dBA SPL
Discomfort Level Above 80
Heavy Traffic 80
Automobile  (at 20 meters) 70
Vacuum Cleaner 65
Conversational Speech (at 1 meter) 60
Quiet Business Office 50
Residential Area at Night 40
Whisper, Rustle of Leaves 20
Rustle of Leaves 10
Threshold of Audibility 0

 

 

Mitigation and Prevention

A friend of mine who lives in New England, one of my former guitar students, recently told me his ears have been ringing for about two years now. He plays in a popular regional jam band on the rise, Superfrog, a spirited group of young players making their mark across the Northeast. As did I in my earlier New England gigging days, they play with an energetic reckless abandon, and they, along with their loyal followers, are living in the magical moments of some of those roaring nightclub dance parties. When he first told me of the recent development of his tinnitus I don’t think he realized the true nature of this beast, how it can slowly progress over many years until it reaches the near unmanageable level of the Pete Townshend’s of the world. Upon discussing it with me he has now decided to invest in some custom musicians ear plugs, with his fellow bandmates also following suit. Some of the other guys in his band don’t have tinnitus yet, and adopting earplugs into their world may ensure they never do.

 

Living with Tinnitus

“Yes, it’s in my left ear. It’s excruciating…I mean, it’s the worst thing ’cause it’s not…It never…It does go away – it’s not true to say that it doesn’t but, uhh…It doesn’t…The doctors say it won’t…It isn’t actually going away – you’ve just gotta suppress…They try to come to terms with what it actually… Why some people fear it – that’s the psychology behind it. They know it’s there but why is it such a horrible sound? Well, you can say why is a guy scratching at a window with his nails such a horrible sound – I couldn’t put up with that! This is worse!” – Jeff Beck from an MTV interview in June 1993

The thing about tinnitus, and perhaps one of the reasons it’s hard to detect in its earliest stages, is that you don’t notice the ringing all the time, even though it’s always there. It depends on the threshold of the sound around you. If you are on the go from the moment you wake up till the moment you lay down to go to sleep at night, you likely won’t hear the ringing throughout your day, as many of the sounds of everyday life will mask it. It’s the quietest moments when it chooses to show itself. The concept of “masking” is quite useful, if not essential, for many tinnitus sufferers. I have a noise generator beside my bed that plays sounds of the ocean while I sleep. I set it on a volume that is just above the volume of my ringing, and this masks the ring enough for me to fall asleep. Some severely afflicted tinnitus sufferers use portable noise generators or play MP3s of soft music or different types of noise for most of their day, all in an effort to mask the relentless sounds in their head.

Some findings might suggest that avoiding or cutting back on alcohol, caffeine, and salt, among other substances, can help reduce the ringing. As tinnitus is considered partly a subjective condition, it becomes difficult to gauge how different variables affect the level of the ringing. I can’t say that I have personally had any success by adding or omitting any parts of my diet.

Stopping It Cold In Its Tracks

“Later in the evening as you lie awake in bed, with the echo from the amplifiers ringing in your head.” 
– Bob Seger – Turn the Page

You can’t get rid of it but you can stop its progression. The one thing that has become completely obvious to me is that earplugs during exposure to loud sounds are ABSOLUTELY ESSENTIAL to prevent the ringing from escalating. I have been wearing custom molded musician’s earplugs, which can be acquired for about $150 with a visit to your local audiologist, for about 12 years now. I wear them not only when performing live with a band, but when mowing the lawn, vacuuming, operating a power saw, anything that causes excessive SPLs. When I’m sleeping on a tour bus, I sleep with foam earplugs to cut down on the rumble of the road. If I fly, I wear earplugs the whole time on the plane.

I’ve also learned how to turn down my music a bit. I’ve experimented with using less powerful guitar amps, speaker attenuators, and drummers that don’t “bash” quite so much. I’m cautious when recording with headphones as well, watching the volume and taking breaks often.

I urge everyone to heed this message. If you play loud music regularly, either live or in the studio, consider the earplugs option, it will be the best $150 you’ll ever spend on gear. And think about your audience too. Are you blowing them out of the room with your guitar amp, lead vocal, or snare drum? Is your band louder than it needs to be to get its point across? Are your ears ringing regularly from your construction job or your job at the airport? Are your kids listening to iPods on 11 all day long? If you think the answer might be yes to any of these, don’t wait until it’s too late to become proactive. Act now or you might wind up hearing the sound of a continual dog whistle for the rest of your life.

So when you have a quiet moment, ask yourself, your family, and your friends this one simple question –

Do you ever hear the sound of true silence?

Our friend Randy Brunson drops by to share the news on his new digital download widget available at yourmuzik.net

In 2007, I had just spent 3 years developing a piece of property in Spring Hill , Tennessee. Until then,……..thats what I did. Building and Development. But music was always a passion.  Coincidentally, by developing where I did, all the new friends I made were in the music business. My longtime friend and business partner, Jim Heaton, was involved at the time building a Nashville based spa business, with partners that were/are in the music business as well. His immediate partner is a great singer/songwriter, and her sister was well on her way to becoming a celebrity with Dancing With The Stars, and eventually a recording contract of her own.

Jim and I have always had our own passion for performing, but an equal passion for the creation of something that would outlast us. Our idea at the time was, in the aftermath of the collapse of Napster,   that someone needed to give independent artists a platform to perform and expose their talents at an affordable cost to them, to  build a facebook for musicians, and a digital download widget that would give independent artists, (as well as established) the ability to directly sell their music to the public digitally, but “RETAIN MOST OF THE MONEY”.

So came the birth of the initial concept for Yourmusik.net.   In 2009, we created a venue for independent artists to perform at  my farm in the Spring Hill, Tennessee area. Billed as “Howling at the Moon”, it was an instant success with over 20 acts, and 350 people attending an afternoon event that lasted for several hours into the night. We initially had hoped to launch Yourmusik.net at the second party, given this summer, but unfortunately had too many problems with the programming of the download widget.  We had another great day managing to bring in “Younger than Yesterday, Former Members of the BYRDS” as a headliner.  Three years later, thousands of dollars poorer, and beat up on by every software programmer that could get their hooks into us, we are finally at a crossroads with a piece of programming that actually works, and does just what we set out for, gives over 80% of the  proceeds of the sale of music back directly to the artist.

I say crossroads, because I feel even after all this, we still have a long way to go to establish everything we set out for.  The rest of our concept is to create a website that gives musicians a resource to turn to other musicians for camaraderie and support, and to the site itself for the least expensive resource for recording, equipment, vocal and instrument lessons, videos, and on line practice and recording, to name just a few things.

What I will say, is that we are proud to present the Yourmusik Download Widget to  independent artists of all genres, and are working constantly to improve the
speed and performance of this programming. We have built in all the necessary reporting/accounting details so that each artist can monitor the results of their sales with this widget.  We  are essentially licensing the use of this widget directly to each artist who would like to use it, to copy and paste to whatever site they wish, be it Facebook, Myspace, or independent.

Social networks have become a major element of artist marketing campaigns. Susan A. Friedmann (TheNichePreneur™ Coach) shares her five biggest mistakes made in marketing through social networks. How have you utilized social networking to build your brand? Share your stories for a chance to win a free day of studio time at The Record Shop!

Over half of all Americans between the ages of 15-34 consider themselves active social network users. They regularly visit well-known social networking sites, such as MySpace or Facebook, or log onto specialty social networks, like Ravelry (devoted to the fiber arts) or GroupRecipes (for the foodie set). While industry research tells us that television watching is declining, especially among this age group, social network use is on the rise: average users spend seven to eight hours a week online. read the full article here….

Matthew Lasar of arstechnica.com shares news on Gene Simmons’ recent comments on illegal downloading. How do you feel about the effect of illegal downloads on the industry and what has been done to discourage P2P users? Share your thoughts for a chance to earn a day of studio time at The Record Shop!

Gene Simmons has made headlines after airing his very strong opinions on P2P and music piracy. Earlier this week, Gene was speaking at the MIPCOM convention in Cannes, France, and he advised people to protect their brand and be ready to lawyer up at a moment’s notice. read the full story here…

Austin Carr of fastcompany.com shares the recent news of how Converse is jumping into the music industry for a unique method of promotion.

Converse is testing a new way to get its foot in the door of the music industry.

The shoe company is building a studio in Brooklyn called Converse Rubber Tracks, which will provide artists with free recording time in exchange for future promotions. Converse is not looking for revenue from the songs themselves–artists will actually keep ownership rights–but it is hoping to gain access to on-the-verge bands, which will generate good will for the brand for helping to break them and get Converse in on the ground floor. read more…….

I read an interesting article this week in Bloomberg Business Week. The piece looks into the new advertising strategies that Facebook offers for businesses. While reading, I wondered if these methods could be implemented by musicians, and labels, as well. Click the link below to read the article and let us know what you think. 

How Facebook Sells You- Bloomberg Business Week

Los Altos, CA – September 14, 2010  Sonoma Wire Works’ FourTrack
multitrack audio recorder for the iPhone® and iPod touch® has been
updated to 4.0 adding powerful new features including file import,
AudioCopy, input monitoring, the GuitarJackâ„¢ control panel and
Taylor EQ. FourTrack 4.0 empowers musicians to easily produce high
quality recordings wherever inspiration strikes.

FourTrack 4.0 New Features:

– File Import: Import audio into FourTrack by opening an audio email
attachment or by dragging audio files into FourTrack’s File Sharing
area under Apps in iTunes. Supports wav, mp3 and aiff formats.
FourTrack’s Sessions folder can now be dragged out of iTunes to the
desktop. These features require iOS 4.0 and iTunes 9.2 or above.

– AudioCopy: Copy a track or a mix in FourTrack. Name a copy to
easily identify it in the AudioCopy history list of up to 12 items
which includes audio previews. Paste to another track in FourTrack,
to another song in FourTrack, to any AudioPaste enabled app, and to
apps that support Apple’s general pasteboard.

– Input Monitoring: Use FourTrack’s settings tool to enable/disable
input monitoring. Input monitoring is enabled when a track is armed
and in either Pause or Record mode. Playback of existing tracks
overrides input monitoring. When input monitoring is on, sliders on
armed tracks are enabled and control the monitor mix.

– GuitarJack Control Panel – Adjust the input settings of the new
GuitarJack audio accessory for compatible iOS devices. Select from
1/4″, stereo 1/8″ or both inputs simultaneously, and adjust input
levels with 60dB of analog gain control. FourTrack remembers
GuitarJack settings. Settings are maintained by the GuitarJack while
powered, and it can be used by most apps that do recording or
playback such as tuners, amp models, and more. When a stereo mode is
selected, tracks will arm in pairs (1&2 or 3&4).

– TaylorEQ – Sonoma Wire Works teamed with Taylor Guitars to create
an input EQ for enhancing the FourTrack recordings of Taylor Guitars
or any acoustic guitar. Select from a range of Taylor body styles in
basic mode, or select the Advanced tab to adjust the 6 band
parametric equalizer manually.

– ARM Optimized Audio Engine – Hand optimized assembly code makes
this the fastest running FourTrack release ever.

– Higher Resolution Graphics: Optimized for the iPhone 4 Retina
Display. 

About FourTrack

The FourTrack multitrack audio recorder is a songwriting and practice
tool for singers, guitar players, piano players and other musicians
who want to capture musical ideas and record songs on their iPhone
and iPod touch (2nd generation and above). Plug in a microphone, arm
a track, record, and repeat. FourTrack works with the iPhone built-in
microphone or a headset mic. WiFi sync allows FourTrack recordings to
be transferred to any desktop computer either by launching RiffWorks
recording software and clicking import, or by downloading the tracks
with a browser, then importing them into any recording software
(DAW). FourTrack is developed by Sonoma Wire Works, makers of
RiffWorksâ„¢ guitar recording software, and by The Retronyms, makers
of Recorder, the top selling voice recorder for the iPhone and iPod
touch. FourTrack is available in the iTunes App store for $9.99.
FourTrack features, guide, images, and videos:
https://www.sonomawireworks.com/fourtrack

About GuitarJack

The GuitarJack audio accessory for compatible iOS devices connects a
wide range of instruments, microphones, and other audio hardware to
the iPod touch® (2nd and 3rd generation), iPhone 3GS and iPhone 3G
(in airplane mode) via 1/4 inch instrument and 1/8 inch stereo
mic/line inputs. Addressing the most frequent request from musicians
who use FourTrack, GuitarJack makes both level control and input
monitoring possible when using a GuitarJack enhanced app. GuitarJack
is not compatible with iPhone 4, iPadâ„¢ or iPod touch 4th
generation. GuitarJack is priced at $199 MSRP. GuitarJack features,
guide, images and video: https://www.sonomawireworks.com/guitarjack

About Sonoma Wire Works

Incorporated in 2003 and headquartered in Los Altos, California,
Sonoma Wire Works develops products and services that help musicians
enjoy playing, recording and sharing music. Sonoma Wire Works’
flagship product is RiffWorks guitar recording software with
InstantDrummer, effects, RiffLinkâ„¢ online music collaboration, and
the RiffWorld.com online community. These products have received
multiple awards for performance and innovation, including a NAMM 08
Best in Show Trendsetter Award. FourTrack and InstantDrummerâ„¢
iPhone apps, AudioCopy/AudioPaste technology for the iPhone,
StudioTrackâ„¢ multitrack for the iPad, and the GuitarJack accessory
for compatible iOS devices are also developed by Sonoma. Drum
products by Sonoma include the DrumCore and KitCore plugins and
DrummerPack library, as well as the Discrete Drums multitrack drum
library. https://www.sonomawireworks.com

©2010 Sonoma Wire Works. All rights reserved. GuitarJack, the
GuitarJack logo, RiffWorks, the RW Logo, RiffWorld, RiffCaster,
RiffLink, InstantDrummer, StudioTrack, the StudioTrack Logo, the
FourTrack Logo, DrumCore, KitCore, and Discrete Drums are trademarks
of Sonoma Wire Works. iPod, iPhone and iPad are trademarks of Apple
Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. All other
trademarks are property of their respective owners.

We are proud to announce that The Record Shop is now offering DAW lessons and support with DAWRESOURCE.COM

Here’s some info on this exciting new company!

DAWRESOURCE.com fills a niche in modern music, reflects industry trend that 

music is now produced entirely using computer music software. 

DAWRESOURCE.com offers live technical and tutorial support for major digital audio workstations (DAW) 

like Pro Tools, Logic, Live, Reason, Cubase, Sonar and more. It reflects music industry reality that almost 

all new music is being produced entirely on computers. 

Coppell, TX September 1, 2010 – DAWRESOURCE.COM opened its doors to the musicians everywhere 

seeking assistance in trouble shooting and learning their digital audio workstations (DAW). DAWs are 

computer music software that allows music producers and musicians to record, edit, and mix an entire 

song on their computer. 

Due to improvements in music software and increased processor speed, it is now possible to produce 

professional quality music on your computer using a DAW. In past, a professional-grade recording could 

only be achieved in a professional studio with hundreds and thousands of dollars worth of hardware. Now 

the hardware is replaced by software plug-in that easily works with modern DAWs. 

DAWRESOURCE.COM offers four support options that include support via phone, support via video 

conferencing using Skype, support at instructor’s studio and support at customer’s home or studio. There 

are also three convenient payment plans to meet all types of budget. 

Support and tutorials are provided by DAW Specialists from around the U.S. Most specialists possess 

official DAW certifications while all DAW Specialists have professional training and years of experience as 

musician and/or sound engineer. 

DAWRESOURCE.COM provides support and tutorial outside U.S. as well. Instructors communicate with 

overseas customers via phone and Skype. Currently all support is available in English and limited in 

Spanish. 

 

About DAWRESOURCE.COM: 

DAWRESOURCE.COM provides live technical and tutorial support for major digital audio workstations 

(DAW). Support is provided through its nation-wide network of highly trained and experienced DAW 

Specialists.